Music

Skint 2016

Skint is a weekend of music and dancing, with workshops, bals and sessions all run by volunteers. I’m on the committee. This year’s Skint was a joy. I am immensely grateful to everyone who came and made it what it was, which, as I’ve said, a joy. These are not the best photos in the world, but they are mine. Bundpolska Workshop. Hands up who’s here for the first time.

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Effectiveness of interval histogram Euclidean distance for predicting tune similarity

In an attempt to quickly find almost exact melodic duplicates (give or take a note or two) in the [folktunefinder.com][1] algorithm I tried comparing the Euclidean distance between their interval histograms.

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French Adventure

H and I visit France, and les rencontres de luthiers et maître sonneurs.

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International Bagpipe Day at the Pitt Rivers

An event to celebrate the second International Bagpipe Day! Held at the Pitt Rivers museum, Oxford.

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OxLork perform at the Ashmolean

oxlork

OxLork, a band of musicians in possession of computers (and, I hope, an increasing knowledge of how to make new things with them) had a gig at the Ashmolean Museum on Friday. Very exciting. Not brilliant photos, but better than nothing.

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Visualising folk tune structures

Traditional tunes have a particular shape to them. Many, especially northern European, have two parts, each repeated, possibly with first and second time bars. Within this arching structure that spans the tune in a few leaps, there are smaller repeated phrases, callbacks and variations. I remembered a visualisation I saw a long time ago which took a MIDI file and visualised the structure. I wanted to do something for the tunes in FolkTuneFinder.

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All OxLork code samples online

oxlork

I am hosting all of the OxLork ChucK lecture code samples here: https://github.com/afandian/oxlork-lecture-code

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Using TASCAM US-122 audio/midi interface with Mountain Lion

(punchline: give up it won’t work but it’s an interesting story)

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Oxford Laptop Orchestra – Lecture 2 – Control Structures and Timbres

oxlork

This is number 2 in my series of lectures in [music technology and ChucK to the Oxford Laptop Orchestra][1]. Give the [first lecture][2] a read before reading this.

[Last week][2] we took a look at why, in my opinion, music and programming are natural bedfellows. We talked about what a program actually is and how it relates to Western music notation. We compared structural features of music and computer programs. We pinned down what the words ‘analogue’ and ‘digital’ actually mean, how sound is transmitted, and finally we wrote a program that plays a tune.

This week we’re going to continue down two parallel paths: more about the programming language and the nature of sound in general. The reason for all of this is to give you the tools to think about what you hear, apply analytical thought to the process of composition and creation, and to enable you to conceive of and make your own ChucK sounds.

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Oxford Laptop Orchestra : Lecture 1 : Music and Programming

oxlork

I’m very excited to be involved with the nascent Oxford Laptop Orchestra. This project, run by and for students at the University of Oxford, follows on from the work of the Princeton Laptop Orchestra. PLOrk, as its known, and now OxLork, is an effort to reproduce the form of performance embodied by a real orchestra or chamber group — that is, a number of individuals performing in concert, in a certain arrangement in space — with modern advances in electroacoustic music.

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