Folktunefinder

Login and favourites are being removed from FolkTuneFinder

On November 30th 2016, the login feature of FolkTuneFinder.com will be removed, and you will no longer be able to use favourites and group tunelists. One month ago I wrote the a blog post about sign-in on FolkTuneFinder and placed a message on the site. I also put word out on the FolkTuneFinder Facebook page. Since then I have recieved only two messages. There are 5,367 accounts on FolkTuneFinder. Some of them are spam, but some of them are real users who log in and use favourites.

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Removing Favourites from FolkTuneFinder?

Summary I want to remove the ‘favourites’ / ‘bookmarks’ feature (and then the ability to log in altogether). I would make sure that no-one lost their ‘favourites’ lists and could transfer them elsewhere. What do you think? Email me at joe@folktunefinder.com , but preferably read the whole piece first! FolkTuneFinder is used by up to 10,000 people per month. It’s enough to make me feel like it’s worth running keeping it going, and I hope I always will.

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New Year, new Folk Tune Finder!

Happy new year! Happy new [Folk Tune Finder][1]! Why not try it out?

Those of you following along at home will know that this is [version 7][2], and that I release approximately one new version per year. This one’s a big one, with lots of changes. I’ll concentrate on four.

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Effectiveness of interval histogram Euclidean distance for predicting tune similarity

In an attempt to quickly find almost exact melodic duplicates (give or take a note or two) in the [folktunefinder.com][1] algorithm I tried comparing the Euclidean distance between their interval histograms.

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Unit Testing in Go, talk at London Go Users Group

A quick talk, the same content as given at Oxford Geek Nights in November 2012. Unit Testing in Go at GLUG : handout version

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Visualising folk tune structures

Traditional tunes have a particular shape to them. Many, especially northern European, have two parts, each repeated, possibly with first and second time bars. Within this arching structure that spans the tune in a few leaps, there are smaller repeated phrases, callbacks and variations. I remembered a visualisation I saw a long time ago which took a MIDI file and visualised the structure. I wanted to do something for the tunes in FolkTuneFinder.

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Unit Testing in Go: talk at Oxford Geek Night

Download the slides for the ‘Unit Testing in Go’, a microslot (exactly 5 minutes!) at Oxford Geek Nights 29 on the 21st November.

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Sound file Plotter in Go using gosndfile / libsndfile

It’s no secret that [golang][1] is my new favourite language. I’ve used it to implement the latest [folktunefinder][2] search engine and really enjoyed it.

On an unrelated note, whilst looking at what libraries are available I came across the [gosndfile][3] library written by [Matt Kane][4] / [@nynexrepublic][5]. It’s a wrapper for [libsndfile][6], a C library for reading and writing sound files.

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From La Mantovana to the Moldau. Musical similarity in the absence of rhythm and what it means to FolkTuneFinder

Má Vlast is a set of pieces written by the composer Smetana in the late 1800s about his homeland, Czechoslovakia. One of the pieces in the set, The Moldau (Vltava in Czech) is one of my favourite symphonies of all time ever. It could be something in my partially Czech blood, it could be the fact that I’m soppy about Romantic-period orchestral music, whatever it is, I love this piece of music and know it intimately.

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FolkTuneFinder version 4 out now

On Monday 9th January 2011, version 4 of FolkTuneFinder.com went public. It was a bit of a journey getting to this point. I run FolkTuneFinder in my spare time. Mostly it runs itself without intervention. I keep an eye on things, monitor spam (except for a recent occasion when it got out of hand) and answer mail. There is a fair amount of programming behind it, and I’ve re-written the search engine a few times over the years.

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